Modern Homes for the Dead

We do not get to decide the home we are raised in. Some spent their youth in brilliant examples of light and space, most of us sleep and play and eat in architectural failures. The dwellings of our formative years are out of our control, even if they help inform us, and help define our sense of shelter, identity and place.

We grow, we learn, we begin to craft our individuality, our sense of style, color and form. Maybe it starts with posters thumbtacked to your bedroom walls. Maybe it takes shape with your first apartment. And as we learn and grow, experience the world and create our own sense of home, we begin to look at furniture differently, kitchen faucets, paint colors, the flow from one room to the next. We build highly individual and customized nests that by extension inform the world about who we are and what we like and believe in.

As we get older and experience more of the world, this sense of style and utlity manifest with the objects we surround ourselves with – the clothes we wear, the car we drive, the art we cherish and the homes we occupy. It doesn’t matter if it is simple or extraordinary  – our identities become inexplicable tied to the dwellings we inhabit.

And then we die.

And get put into a plastic bag with a wire twist.

And crammed into a cardboard box.

Or maybe a spun brass urn the funeral director pointed out in a catalog.

This is your new home.

This is the place your body will occupy for the rest of time.

Articles boast about 300 square foot homes. But what about the 300 cubic inch home? Where is that story? Because 300 cubic inches is plenty of space for most (cremated) Americans to reside in. Why does our connection to design and individual style so often end with the beating of our hearts?

Greg Lundgren has been designing and championing high craft, modern urns, and brought some of the leading 21st century architects and designers into the conversation. Architects like Tom Kundig, Lorcan O’Herlihy, George Suyama and Eric Kahn. Designers such as Stefan Gulassa, Mark Mitchell and Arne Pihl. This conversation is very much alive and changing the way we consider our last home. Do the people you love reside in cardboard boxes? Lundgren Monuments believes that with death comes the opportunity to bring more art and design into the world, that monuments and urns help define our cultural heritage, and at present, we are failing in our approach to death and the legacies we leave behind.

Floating Urn #4

Floating Urn #4 – design by Greg Lundgren (mild steel + cast glass)

 

The Final Turn – design by Tom Kundig mild steel

The Final Turn – design by Tom Kundig (mild steel)

Floating Urn #6 – design by Greg Lundgren (Plate glass + wood)

Floating Urn #6 – design by Greg Lundgren (Plate glass + wood)

Death by Rock and Roll (detail) -  Eric Kahn + Russell N. Thompsen +                                                               Heather Flood + Ramiro Diaz-Granados (3D printed prototype)

Death by Rock and Roll (detail) – Eric Kahn + Russell N. Thompsen +
Heather Flood + Ramiro Diaz-Granados
(3D printed prototype)

Open Tear – design by Greg Lundgren (Paper mache)

Open Tear – design by Greg Lundgren (Paper mache)

Fir Heart Urn – design by Arne Pihl (Douglas Fir)

Fir Heart Urn – design by Arne Pihl (Douglas Fir)

Untitled – design by Mark Mitchell (biodegradable silk urn)

Untitled – design by Mark Mitchell (biodegradable silk urn)

 

Find out more at lundgrenmonuments.com.

By |2016-11-15T19:41:22+00:00September 8th, 2014|Industry Alerts|Comments Off on Modern Homes for the Dead

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